Category: Archives

The Chemical Rhetoric Group’s Article on Rosalind Franklin is hot of the presses!

Our article, “Mapping Nature’s Scientist: The Posthumous Demarcation of Rosalind Franklin’s Crystallographic Data,” is available here from the Quarterly Journal of Speech. We began the research for this piece at our 2017 Writing Retreat in Park City, UT, and it is so much fun to see it published after lots of hard work. We hope…

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend

Last spring I was awarded a Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work on a project entitled, Julia Ward Howe, Helene Deutsche, and Sophia Kleegman: 20th-Century Women Shaping the Science and Medicine of Fertility. To read more about this project and the award, click here.

Madison Krall and Robin Jensen take part in RSA’s “Medical Rhetoric in the Archives” Seminar

In the beginning of June, Madison and Robin headed to the University of Maryland to take part in a Rhetoric Society of America Institute Seminar entitled, Medical Rhetoric in the Archives. Robin worked with the amazing Professor Jordynn Jack to lead the seminar of about 30 scholars through a variety of readings, discussions, and activities…

Chemical Rhetoric Takes on Friday Night

Last Friday night, Melissa Parks, Madison Krall, and Emily Krebs took over one of our lecture halls to analyze documents. From all accounts, they absolutely lit the place up with their on-point analysis and witty repartee, not to mention their array of post-its, highlighters, and La Croix.  Way to teach us all how to live-it-up…

Trip to the Science History Institute in Philadelphia

Earlier this year, I won a travel grant to visit the Othmer Library of Chemical History at Philadelphia’s Science History Institute. This allowed me to spend the last week in June combing through the library’s tremendous archives and exploring Old Town Philly. This is me taking up residence in the Othmer Library. The archives are…

Maud May Babcock Plaque Featured in Downtown SLC

Founder of the Department of Speech at the University of Utah, Maud May Babcock was also the University’s first female faculty member. Today she is recognized with this plaque in downtown Salt Lake City. Over the years, Professor Babcock inspired many to achieve academic prominence. Most recently, doctoral students in the Department of Speech Communication…